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Clean Diesel Technology to Help Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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The U.S has committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by a whopping 28% by 2025 at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 21). In order to achieve this goal, clean diesel technology will be a primary component to the plan, according to Allen Schaeffer, Diesel Technology Forum executive director.

Since the U.S introduced nearly 2 million of the newest generation of clean diesel commercial trucks in the in 2007, there has already been savings of 21 million barrels of crude oil 9 million tonnes of CO2, 1.45 million tonnes of NOx (mono-nitrogen oxides), 39,500 tonnes of particulate matter, and 880 million gallons of diesel. Schaeffer claimed. “These results demonstrate why clean diesel will be a key player helping the U.S. and many other nations achieve their climate commitments.”

This will require companies to implement the newest generation of diesel engines. Although there are other unique fuel applications, diesel has emerged as the primary fuel source to reduce emissions going forward. Nations outside of the U.S will see similar benefits as they begin to implement clean fuel. Ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) has been the U.S standard for over 5 years. We are beginning to see these standards in other nations, as we aim reduce emissions worldwide.

“Diesel engines have emerged as the fuel-efficient technology of choice for many decades of doing the business of the global economy,” said Schaeffer, “with diesel engines and fuel moving the overwhelming majority of people and goods in every corner of the world.”

Reducing emissions from power plants was the number one priority for U.S efforts, and emissions from commercial and passenger vehicles was second to that.

The next step in the combat against greenhouse gas emissions is the implementation of renewable high quality biofuels. These fuels have the capability of delivering 50% less emissions than their counterparts. The U.S supply grew to over 1 billion gallons last year and will continue to grow as the country continues efforts to reduce emissions