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A consortium of heavy duty vehicle associations have joined forces to create and implement a groundbreaking agreement that is aimed at providing OEM information to repair centers in the U.S. and Canada. The agreement, known as the Memorandum of Understanding, is intended for heavy truck and buses of 5 tons or more that were manufactured since the 2010 model year and is meant to provide OEM data, parts and specialized equipment to independent repair centers and vehicle owners.

The plan is to give vehicle owner/operators more service options, including computerized data and the latest diagnostic tools. It will allow independent service centers to perform tests and repairs that meet OEM specifications, using data that was previously only available through authorized dealers and service centers.

On the other side of the MoU agreement, participating organizations have agreed to monitor dealer and OEM concerns to ensure that data is being utilized properly, and that the information is not being used to circumvent OEM standards. This oversight is beneficial to the trucking industry, and reinforces the notion that owner/operators should have access to approved parts, tools and diagnostic services for their own trucks.

Similar efforts have been focused at the state and federal level, but have achieved only minor successes in limited areas. Instead of creating unified access, earlier attempts have led to scattered support for the idea of a right to access for electronic engine information. The MoU improves on the concept, promoting access to critical repair information by independent facilities that previously had to obtain diagnostics through dealers. This allows more accurate truck repair using approved materials without complicated state, federal and national regulations that do more to muddy the waters than to clarify data access rights.

The MoU clearly separates heavy trucks from private transportation, a distinction lacking in many state-level initiatives which has led to confusing legislation. The agreement is tailored for the heavy duty vehicle industry, bypassing the need for ineffective government regulation. For many, the repair agreement is a positive step in the right direction, and has been a long time coming.